Struggling With Depression?
By Fontaine Center
April 15, 2020
Tags: Depression  

Have you had a life event such as a death, job change, loss of a relationship or financial downturn? These circumstances and more, combined with hereditary factors and physiological problems, can lead to a psychiatric problem known as depression. This common mood disorder cannot be ignored but needs accurate evaluation from your doctor.. Your depression can be managed.

Who struggles with depression?

More people than you may realize struggle with the sadness and emptiness that is clinical depression. In fact, Medline Plus reports that about 19 million American teenagers and adults have depressive symptoms which continue, impacting work, school, relationships and more.

Why depression happens

Your team of osteopaths routinely screen their patients for depression. Most commonly, depression is a chemical imbalance in the brain, specifically centered on a neurotransmitter called serotonin. Also called the happy chemical, serotonin greatly contributes to an individual's sense of well-being, purpose and confidence. In its absence, says the National Institute of Mental Health, numerous negative symptoms arise--some thought-related and emotional and others, physical in nature.

Symptoms of depression

They are many and vary widely from individual to individual. Women are more prone than men, and teens more than adults. Symptoms may include:

  • Hopelessness

  • Listlessness

  • Feeling empty, sad and helpless

  • Irritability and anger

  • Poor concentration and memory

  • Cognitive and somatic slowness

  • Decision fatigue

  • Perfectionism

  • Negative thoughts

  • Lack of libido

  • Apathy

  • Inability to start or complete tasks

  • Suicidal thoughts

Treating depression

It's important to get treatment for clinical depression. The first step toward wellness is admitting something is wrong. Your internist wants to hear about your symptoms so he or she can formulate a treatment plan and/or refer for psychiatric evaluation or psychological therapy.

Medication seems most fundamental to treating depression. SSRI's (serotonin re-uptake inhibitors) are oral medications which boost critical neurotransmitters. Other medications may be needed to treat co-existing conditions such as anxiety.

In addition, talk therapies, either alone or in combination with medications, allow patients to express, or discover, their feelings and formulate strategies to manage them. These talk therapies may include cognitive, behavioral or interpersonal therapies.

Don't go it alone

Isolation worsens depression. Your doctor encourage you to reach out to them, a loved one, or trusted friend and to speak of your struggle. 

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